Cheese Fries And Hickory Dipping Sauce

Cheese Fries And Hickory Dipping Sauce

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Note: 1) consider using regular fries

My parents and I ate cheese fries with hickory dipping sauce often when I was young. Since the frozen fries were already partially cooked, I only had to fry them for 3 1/2 minutes at 350°F/177°C. I put 2 liters of canola oil in heavy saucepan because I only had canola oil in my pantry. I like the flavor that vegetable oil adds to many foods. Frying with a portable induction cooktop is very easy and exciting. After cooking the fries, I smothered them with mild cheddar and I microwaved them for 2 minutes.

These breaded fish fillets belong on a sandwich made with a bun, tartar sauce, lettuce, and tomatoes. They were moist and flavorful. I cooked the fillets for 3 1/2 minutes at 350°F/177°C. The sauce is a 1:1 mixture of hickory barbeque sauce and mayonnaise; I mixed 1/4 cup of hickory barbeque sauce with 1/4 cup of mayonnaise.

Since scones do not absorb cooking oil while being fried, and since people use canola oil for making salads, and since I cannot remember people suggesting that people should avoid salads with vinaigrette, I believe that the suggestion that frying is bad may be folklore. People probably fry unhealthy foods by using poor quality meat and salt. I currently have fruits and vegetables in the morning, and I have protein and starches at night.

Note: 1) people have to explain why fat accumulates on the outside of an artery, trans fats can be transported to the outside of an artery, some trans fats were made with vegetable oil, by hydrogenating the oil, the shape of the molecule of the oil changed, this new molecule of oil can be transported to the outside of the artery; therefore, since people have this knowledge, people would probably explain that molecules of salad oil change when they are heated if they become harmful to the body, 2) some amount of sodium and fat are recommended by the FDA, 3) if the body is a machine, and the nervous system requires sodium, then people should know how to use salt to have sodium, similarly with various types of sugar (combination is exciting if a person uses water and exercises, [hormones]) 

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Roast Goose – Roasted Goose

Roast Goose – Roasted Goose

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Note: 1) dictionaries list roast as an adjective, as with roast beef, 2) (?) the past participle of roast is roasted; when using the verb roast as an adjective, roasted should be the correct word to use 

Some people may associate roasted geese with Christmas. I could not wait until December. The flavor of this goose was rich and gamey.  These flavors took me to a place that I wanted to be. Roasting a goose is easy when someone has a roasting pan with a rack and a thermometer. Goose fat is very oily. I had to use a bottle of shampoo once to clean a mess I created with fat. I rubbed the goose with salt and pepper the night before I roasted the goose.

I roasted the goose in a 450°F/232°C oven for 10 minutes and then I reduced the heat to 350°F/177°C. After about 1 hour and 36 minutes the internal temperature of the goose was 175°F/80°C. I read two recipes that included putting 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) of water in the roasting pan. In a steel roasting pan, when roasting chicken, the fat from the tail can burn and smoke. I am going to guess that the water is used primarily to protect the fat from burning. After cooking the water and fat mixture, someone can use a spoon to put the fat in a jar. Some resources suggest that the fat is good for 1 month if someone refrigerates the fat. The humidity in the oven will change how the skin of the goose browns. The skin will probably be less crispy.

I was thinking about my oven. The oven has a vent. The heat that rises escapes through the vent. Cool air must travel through the door. This explains why the front of the oven is cooler than the back. There is a vent in the door because if the door was sealed, the air in the door would expand. The expanding air might destroy the door.

Roast Goose

Goose Fat

1. Barbara Grunes: Williams-Sonoma: Roasting (New York: Simon & Schuster, Inc., 2002), 38.

Navajo Tacos

Navajo Tacos

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These are great! I talked about Navajo tacos in my blog post Fried Scones. They are served at some state fairs. Traditional Navajo cuisine may include stew made with rabbit meat. I have traveled through the Navajo reservation in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. I have driven through places in each state near the four corners, including Colorado. I remember seeing a red star over Gallop, New Mexico. A main road that travels through the reservation was once called 666. I have eaten fried bread with hot peanut butter at the home of a Navajo family in Arizona. I spent a lot of time in this part of America when I was young. I have backpacked many times in the deserts near the Navajo reservation.

This was made by smothering fried scones with taco meat, pinto beans, lettuce, tomatoes, cheese, and sour cream. Some Navajo people may call the scones fried bread. The middles of the pieces of dough will not cook if they are too thick. The dough from my recipe for Fried Scones should make 6 large pieces of fried bread.

Bavarian Seasonings – A Simple German Dinner

Bavarian Seasonings – A Simple German Dinner

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This was exciting. Bratwurst, caramelized onions with Bavarian seasonings, and polenta (grits) with butter and gruyere. The caramelized onions were very very good! The Bavarian seasonings from Penzeys are a mixture of crushed brown mustard, rosemary, garlic, thyme, bay leaf and sage. I grilled the sausages. There was a medicinal flavor in the polenta because I used iodized salt. The flavor of butter and gruyere on polenta is great! The mustard was not necessary because the flavor of these bratwursts was exciting.

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Fried Scones

Fried Scones

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Note: 1) consider putting oil on the knife when cutting the dough, Thomas Keller recommends this when cutting some types of pastry or bread dough

This is something that I had with my family when I was a young person. Using Thomas Keller’s Bouchon Bakery cookbook introduced me to slack dough. The dough that we used to buy for making scones was similar to slack dough. The bakery where we used to buy the dough was outside the city. Driving there was exciting. Where I lived, Navajo tacos were served on big scones.  I am excited to make Navajo tacos with this recipe.

These scones are very flavorful. They may be the best scones I have ever eaten. The flavor of the scones is very exciting once they have cooled. Thomas Keller’s rule for serving bread is to reheat the bread once it has cooled. He does this because carry over cooking will continue to cook the bread. I am suggesting this because the flavor is more exciting. If they are served warm, I would suggest using salted butter. I ate them with butter and honey because my mother served hot fried scones with butter and honey. We also ate corn bread with butter and honey.

The recipe is based on Thomas Keller’s recipe for Pain Palladin. Palladin is the name of the French chef Jean-Louis Palladin [1][2]. There is an article online that describes his life and interests. Thomas Keller and the article explain that he was interested in finding fresh and exciting ingredients. People suggest that he may have been responsible for chefs requesting people to have fresh and exciting ingredients. When he came to America, there may have only been iceberg lettuce available at a store. He also uses fish tongues as an ingredient in some of his recipes. He has at least one cookbook available online, Jean-Louis: Cooking with the Seasons.

I made these scones with advanced baking methods. The Bouchon Bakery cookbook simplifies advanced baking techniques. Having all of these techniques and methods in one place is very exciting. To make scones that have the flavor of bread made with basic baking methods: add salt with the other ingredients, use table salt, use yeast with more flavor, and knead the dough for less amount of time. Since Bouchon Bakery cookbook simplifies advanced baking techniques, I will probably continue to use the things I learned in Thomas Keller’s book when I make bread.

Download The Recipe:

Fried Scones

1. Thomas Keller: Bouchon Bakery (New York: Artisan, 2012), 306.

 

Sate

Sate

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Sate or satay is food from an Indonesian or Malasian culture. To make sate, marinated meat is usually barbecued on skewers. Sate can also be broiled. Penzeys gave me a free bottle of sate seasonings after I bought some spices. They are extremely generous. Every day they appear to have something to give to a customer. This simple recipe is from Le Cordon Bleu Complete Cooking Techniques. The recipe for the peanut sauce was adapted from a recipe online at Epicurious. The marinade includes the seasonings. Probably since there is lime in the marinated, and since lime contains acid, the texture of the chicken changes. Some people describe the texture as being mushy. Chicken breast meat is usually very firm. When making sate with chicken breasts, I thought that the texture created by the marinade was exciting. Reduce the amount of time that the chicken marinates to reduce the softening effect on the texture of the chicken by the marinade. These breasts marinated for about 24 hours.

Preparing The Marinade

Making The Peanut Sauce

Making Sate

Barbecuing And Serving The Sate

Download The Recipe:

Chicken Sate

Peanut Sauce

Cedar-Plank Salmon

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The cedar plank made the flavor of this salmon very exciting. Some places have large planks for cooking large fillets. This small portion of salmon was sold on a small plank. Smoking is a great cooking technique. Some bloggers have stovetop smokers [1][2], and some chefs use smoking guns to fill chambers of food [3]. Grilled apples are interesting because they are almost similar to baked apples in a pie. The heat must caramelize some of the apple to create the sweet flavor of a grilled apple.

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