Cajun Flageolet Bean Soup With Thomas Keller’s Buttermilk Biscuits

Cajun Flageolet Bean Soup With Thomas Keller’s Buttermilk Biscuits

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This Cajun Flageolet Bean Soup is my new recipe. I am excited. This soup summarizes some of my experiences learning to cook for the past 6 months. Once the flavors combine after cooling the soup, the soup has great flavor. To make this soup, I thought about the Cuban Black Bean Soup I put on this blog, and a recipe for Cajun White Beans with Andouille from Deep South Dish. The idea for the soup is to mix “perfect ratios” of sautéed French vegetables with cooked meat and beans. The beans were seasoned with vegetables and herbs used by French chefs. I added Cajun seasonings to the cooking liquid from the beans. The soup was thickened by adding flour to the vegetables. These ideas could be used to make several soups from different cultures.

I used Andouille sausages from D’Artagnan.  D’Artagnan advertises on WordPress and I found some of their products at markets where I live. These were the best Andouille sausages I have had. Cajun food may be confusing to prepare because it requires someone to know things about cooking professionally. Popular Andouille sausages are usually heavily spiced sausages that are soft. Some Andouille sausages are firm and spiced. For a beginner in the kitchen, the fine flavors of a French sausage may be confusing because the flavors are not strong. These sausages from D’Artagnan had the fine flavors someone with experience might expect from a French sausage, but they also had a lot of flavor. They also had flavor after being boiled. These were great sausages. I was wishing to have a piece of their slab bacon. Their cookbook is very interesting.

These French white heirloom beans from Rancho Gordo gave me the experience I always desire to have when thinking about white beans. Knowing the flavor of white beans is so important. I cannot wait to make soup with these beans using a smoked ham hock. I am very pleased that I found Rancho Gordo, and that I am able to have these beans from a market where I live.

Thomas Keller’s buttermilk biscuits are the finest and most delicate buttermilk biscuits I have made. Someone should consider halving the recipe. I make square biscuits because the trimmings from making circular biscuits make biscuits with a different texture than the texture of the circular biscuits. I explored this idea in my blog post Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits.

After making these biscuits, I believe that someone can determine how their biscuits will taste by tasting the dry ingredients mixed with butter. If this is true, then someone can think about designing a biscuit. Maybe someone could taste the dry ingredients without butter. I believe that these biscuits were designed to have great flavor. Since making flaky biscuits may depend on moisture or expanding gasses, adding more baking powder might make a flakier biscuit, but the flavor of the additional baking powder might be offensive.

Note: 1) since the broth was not added to the pan that contained the flour, someone might complain since the pan is not perfectly clean, using a beurre manié [1] or making a roux in a separate pan may be more classical techniques, or someone could use a pot and suffocate the vegetables and flour with the liquid and the beans, I deglazed the pan with liquid from the beans (to make food fast, fast food)

Cajun Flageolet Bean Soup

To know the flavor of this soup, cool the soup to permit the flavors to combine

Ingredients

  • 1 pound cooked Flageolet Beans (or white beans) and cooking liquid
  • 12 ounces Andouille or beef sausage, sliced
  • 5 ounces smoked bacon (consider smoked turkey bacon), cut crosswise to make 1/2-inch strips*
  • 2 cups sweet yellow onions, medium dice
  • 1 cup baby carrots, sliced
  • 1 cup celery, halved lengthwise, and cut 1/4-inch crosswise
  • 1 cup scallions, mixture of green and white parts, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons garlic
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon Cajun spices (not salty seasonings, otherwise adjust recipe)**
  • 1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley, minced
  • Salt

Instructions

  • Reduce the beans a little, just until the water is below the surface of the beans
  • Brown the sausage over medium heat in a large saucepan, and put in a bowl
  • Render the fat from the bacon between medium and medium-low heat in the same pan, drain, and put in the bowl with the sausages
  • Remove some bacon grease if there is too much bacon grease
  • Add some olive oil to the pan, there should be 1/4 cup of grease and oil
  • Sauté the onions, carrots, and celery over medium heat until the onions are translucent, about 12 minutes
  • Add the garlic and sauté the vegetables until the garlic is fragrant, about 2 minutes
  • Add the flour, stir the vegetables, and cook for about 2 minutes
  • Add liquid from the beans to deglaze the pan
  • Remove the pan from the heat
  • Add the Cajun spices to the beans
  • Add the vegetables and meat to the beans
  • Add the parsley
  • Add salt to taste
  • Boil the soup
  • Simmer the soup for 30 minutes to combine the flavors
  • To have the best experience, cool the beans, and warm them before serving

* If people believe that the brand of bacon that they are using has a strong smoky flavor, consider using less bacon.

** I want the beans to be cooked in salt water. If someone is going to use these beans in Cajun soup, and if someone is going to use a salty Cajun seasoning, then the seasonings must be added to the beans in the recipe for making Flageolet Beans. Since the seasonings are probably mixed with table salt or sea salt, consider using 1 tablespoon of seasonings, and if desired, add less than 1 teaspoon more of the seasonings, or add more table salt 1/4 teaspoon at a time while tasting the broth after each addition.

Cajun Flageolet Soup

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Thomas Keller’s Buttermilk Biscuits

Download The Recipes:

Flageolet Beans

Cajun Flageolet Soup

Thomas Keller’s Buttermilk Biscuits

Buttermilk Crêpes

Buttermilk Crêpes

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These crêpes were very satisfying. A grocery store where I live has weekly sales that sometimes include cookware. Since I always wanted a crepe pan, I got this pan for a very great price. It works well. The best heat for making crepes is probably between medium-low and medium. I have big plans for these crêpes. The batter is probably thicker than the batter for crêpes made with milk. I used an existing recipe. I substituted milk with buttermilk, I added 1 additional teaspoon of sugar, and I added 1/4 cup of water.

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Download The Recipe:

Crêpes

Thomas Keller’s Recipe For Making Breadcrumbs And The Ideas For My Improved French Bread Recipe

Thomas Keller’s Recipe For Making Breadcrumbs And The Ideas For My Improved French Bread Recipe

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This is Thomas Keller’s recipe for making breadcrumbs. These bread crumbs are great. They are very lightly browned. He bakes them at 250°F/121°C for 1 hour on a baking sheet. After 30 minutes, he moves them around. I had trouble appreciating the process of making bread with a mixer. I have improved my recipe. I am going to suggest that water absorption is the most interesting thing to observe when making bread. Different techniques effect how flour absorbs the water. Without making several loaves,  I am excited when the dough is soft but not sticky because the machine will knead the dough. The rules for using a Kitchenaid mixer are to knead the dough using the first 2 speeds. When the dough is soft, the mixer will knead the dough as if the machine is working at higher speeds. I will probably make a video that shows how cocoa moves through white dough to demonstrate how flour may travel through the dough while it is being kneaded. Some people may want to add as much flour to the dough as possible. I may have found a book that has technical information that can be used to create a procedure based on science to make bread. The goal in this blog post is to hydrate the flour, and to create bread with a fine crumb.

Note: 1) how the dough is hydrated appears to determine how successfully the mixer kneads the dough

I found my original ideas for French bread in the Joy Of Cooking. Soft white bread was something my family always had in the kitchen. I remember going to the grocery store where soft loaves of French bread were put near the magazines near the cashier. There were times when my stepfather enjoyed eating French bread and boiled ham sandwiches. Eating soft white bread is exciting because I believe that feeling starch dissolve in my body makes me happy.

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My best method for making bread (my recipe):

  • Grease a bowl
  • Boil 1/2 cup water (in a microwave)
  • Put the salt and yeast in a mixing bowl
  • Put the flour in a separate bowl
  • Add 1 cup of cool water to the boiling water
  • Adjust the water to be about 125°F/52°C
  • Using the whisk attachment, mix the salt, yeast, and 2 cups of flour
  • Using the paddle attachment, mix all of the water with the ingredients in the mixing bowl
  • Add flour 1/4 cup at a time to make a soft shaggy dough
  • Using the dough hook, mix the remaining flour to the dough 1/4 cup at a time
  • Using hands, lift the dough out of the bowl once the dough is a ball
  • If the dough is not sticky, knead the dough for 8 minutes
    • THE RULES
      • IF THE DOUGH IS STICKY, ADD 1 TABLESPOON OF FLOUR AT A TIME
      • IF THE DOUGH IS TOO FIRM, ADD 1 TABLESPOON OF WATER AT A TIME
  • The dough will become very smooth
  • Let the dough rise for 2 hours
  • Punch the dough and gently form a ball with the dough
  • Let the dough rest for 10 minutes
  • Flour a surface with 1/4 cup of flour
  • Roll the dough to make something similar to a rectangle (be very careful, be gentle when using a rolling pin, make the dough one thickness, observe a sheeter work)
  • Roll the rectangle into a loaf
  • Pinch the seams and tuck the ends of the loaf
  • Move the flour around the surface
  • Roll the cylindrical loaf in flour (French bread baked in a humid oven can have an unattractive appearance, the flour gives the surface of the bread a nice appearance)
  • Let the loaf rise for 2 hours on a baking sheet covered with parchment or a silicon mat
  • Put a pan in the oven to hold 1 cup of hot water
  • Preheat the oven to 400°F/205°C
  • Pour the water in the pan
  • Bake the loaf for 15 minutes
  • Reduce the heat to 350°F/152°C
  • Bake the loaf for about 20 minutes
  • Knock on the loaf to hear a hollow sound, otherwise continue to bake the loaf
  • Let the loaf cool
  • Store the loaf in a plastic bag

Nuance – Finding The Foundation For The Science Of Cooking – Trick Vs. Technique

Nuance – Finding The Foundation For The Science Of Cooking – Trick Vs. Technique

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I was studying to fill in gaps in my education. Engineering and computer science problems, and the math problems that entertained Einstein, require someone to be good at doing elementary math (arithmetic), algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. While I was doing this, I got a copy of Euclid’s Elements, and I read the forward. It was written by someone that used manuscripts from London and Paris and other places. After searching around on the internet, I discovered that people from Portugal have an interesting and technical approach to cooking food. I lacked the knowledge I needed to describe what I was searching to understand. There was something similar to the forward in Euclid’s Elements and recipes from Portugal. What I was searching for appeared to be related to math and science. Not necessarily contemporary industrial science, but natural philosophy and mathematics. While I was searching the internet for a cookbook, I found Escoffier. His books seemed to excite me in the same way that a geometry book excites me. After meeting Escoffier, I found Jacques Pépin. At his Facebook website, he has introduced me to gastronomy, Brillat-Savarin, and Oliver Raymond. His recipes are very exciting. After shopping for cookware, I met Thomas Keller. I read his books often. His books and my experience cooking with his recipes, and the recipes I have from meeting Jacques Pépin, led me to what I originally needed to know. I needed to know that a culinary artist must work to have new techniques and methods. Techniques and methods give a person the opportunity to think and understand how to cook. A collection of techniques and methods may be similar to learning the foundations of a science. Without knowing techniques and methods, I was collecting tricks for cooking. I believe that people would reject me if I said the phrase “tricks of the trade” because this would be a clear sign that I lack something that is important to the pretensions of my culture. I believed that people would believe that I am ignorant. Because contemporary philosophy is usually psychology, and since elementary knowledge is something given to children, I lacked the ability to be creative. I have had to give myself seminary lessons, prepare to read ancient Greek philosophy, and to be able to do arithmetic and algebra to solve problems, and finally study the culinary arts to recover from being abandoned to live as a critic of psychology. I am very happy that I met these chefs because they have given me the opportunity to be happy. I am now able to understand how I can use science to be a more creative person.

 

American Aioli – Less Creamy – Less Thick

American Aioli – Less Creamy – Less Thick

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Aioli at restaurants in America is usually not as thick as mayonnaise. This recipe is related to my blog post Thomas Keller’s Mayonnaise Or Aioli. Here is a recipe adapted from a recipe in a video by ChefSteps for making American aioli. The sugar can be substituted with honey or agave, and the vinegar can be substituted with lemon juice or different types of vinegar. Consider chilling the sauce and serving it on a sandwich or as a dip with crudités [1][2] or fries.

Note: 1) making taco sauce with aioli with agave and cayenne may be interesting

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon table salt (1/2 teaspoon Diamond kosher salt, a pinch and a dash of Morton kosher salt)
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 cup oil

Instructions

  • Add everything but the egg yolks and oil to a blender container
  • Blend the ingredients to make a smooth sauce
  • Add the egg yolks
  • Blend the ingredients to make a smooth sauce
  • Add the oil slowly while the blender is running, or in small amounts by turning the blender off and on

Download The Recipe:

American Aioli

1. “Rich, Buttery American-Pistachio Aioli.” YouTube video, 2:09. Posted by “ChefSteps,” April 14, 2016. https://youtu.be/6FNDIz1FeE0.

Thomas Keller’s Mayonnaise Or Aioli

Thomas Keller’s Mayonnaise Or Aioli

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Using an electric whisk makes making mayonnaise fast and easy. Washing dishes is more difficult than making mayonnaise. I talked about making mayonnaise in my blog post How To Make Mayonnaise – Une Emulsion Froide – A Cold Emulsion. Thomas Keller delivers another amazing recipe. This is very good aioli. I like Thomas Keller’s strategy for using exciting cooking techniques and methods to release the flavors of vegetables, poultry, and meat available at small farms, farmers markets, and gardens. Without Thomas Keller, and some other important people, I would prepare everything à la créole served with beer from a keg. Knowing the techniques of a French chef makes me happy. Thomas Keller gives people so much to do and to think about. I cannot wait to bake!

Mayo:

Ingredients

  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 cup canola oil or canola oil used to make garlic confit (recipe below)
  • 1/2 tablespoon + 1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Diamond kosher salt (3/4 teaspoon Morton kosher salt)

Instructions

  • Put egg yolks in a bowl
  • Mix the egg yolks with a whisk
  • In the beginning, add the oil very slowly, drop by drop, while whisking the ingredients
  • Continue to slowly add oil while whisking, the mayonnaise should start to thicken
  • Do not quickly add the last amount of oil, continue to slowly add oil
  • Mix the lemon juice and salt into the mayonnaise
  • Put the mayonnaise in a bowl

Garlic Confit:

The goal is to cook the garlic cloves without significantly changing their color. Heat garlic cloves on the lowest possible heat completely submerged in canola oil on a small burner in a saucepan for 45 minutes. Initially use medium-low heat, and once bubbles appear around the cloves, reduce the heat to low and move the saucepan to only have 1/2 of the saucepan on the burner. Thomas Keller recommends using a heat diffuser.

Download The Recipes:

Thomas Keller’s Mayonnaise Or Aioli

Things People Need To Know About Making Mayonnaise

1. Thomas Keller: ad hoc at home (New York: Artisan, 2009), 266, 333.

How To Make Mayonnaise – Une Emulsion Froide – A Cold Emulsion

How To Make Mayonnaise – Une Emulsion Froide – A Cold Emulsion

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Today I am making mayonnaise with Jacques Pépin and Emeril Lagasse using the book The French Cook: Sauces by Holly Herrick. Emeril Lagasse has many exciting recipes for making mayonnaise. I chose the recipe in this blog post by Emeril Lagasse because it uses cayenne pepper. After putting this mayonnaise in the refrigerator for about an hour, I was able to believe that the flavor of the mayonnaise was great.

An emulsion is a sauce made with two immiscible liquids. People cannot mix immiscible liquids without an emulsifier. From a chemical point of view, an emulsifier probably bonds the molecules of the immiscible liquids. Mayonnaise is a type of emulsion. I am not able to find a satisfying explanation about why mayonnaise is an emulsion. Some explanations suggest the immiscible liquids in mayonnaise are the egg yolks and the oil. Other explanations explain that the vinegar and mustard contain water, and that egg yolks and an emulsifier in mustard emulsifies the water in the vinegar and the mustard with the oil. The latter (second) explanation is consistent with my experience reading about emulsifiers in books for culinary artists. The former (first) explanation requires someone to believe that the emulsifier is an immiscible liquid. [1][2][3]

Here are the things people need to know about making mayonnaise:

  1. People should believe that making mayonnaise is easy (and exciting)
  2. Use a non-reactive glass bowl because
    • Stainless may change the color of the mayonnaise
    • Copper and acid react and they will change the color of the mayonnaise
  3. Clean the bowl with white vinegar
  4. The ingredients should be room temperature
  5. Since bacteria in eggs can make someone ill, consider pasteurizing the eggs
    • Cook the eggs at 150°F/65.6°C for 4 minutes
    • Consider putting the eggs in ice water to stop them from cooking
  6. Some people explain that 1 egg yolk can emulsify 2/3 cup of oil, other ingredients may also contain emulsifiers
    • Consider this explanation as a reason for putting everything but the oil in the bowl before beating the ingredients to make the mayonnaise
  7. Using a spout on a bottle of oil may be appealing to some people
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      Fig. 1: Using A Spout
  8. Most people may use white pepper when making mayonnaise, some people may use other type of pepper, cayenne is an alternative to white pepper
  9. French mayonnaise is commonly made with Dijon, some people argue that adding Dijon makes the mayonnaise a rémoulade
  10. Most people may use (white) wine vinegar when making mayonnaise, someone probably may use any type of vinegar
  11. Mix the mayonnaise in one direction, because without doing science, and since mayonnaise is expensive to make, anything that offends the creaminess or smoothness of the mayonnaise can seem threatening or similar to anticipating the disappointment experienced when making curdled mayonnaise; the mayonnaise can appear to be chunky when using an electric whisk
  12. Mayonnaise can be made with vegetable, canola, sunflower, corn, and olive oil
  13. Using vegetable oil makes mayonnaise that tastes similarly to Hellmann’s mayonnaise
  14. A combination of canola, vegetable, and olive oil was interesting (1/2 cup canola, 1/4 cup vegetable, 1/4 cup olive oil)
  15. Bitter olive oil makes terrible mayonnaise
  16. Mayonnaise made with greater proportions of olive oil is probably good to use with sandwiches, but it is not exciting to eat with a spoon. Bitter olive oil also can make a vinaigrette offensive. The confusing problem is that the vinaigrette or mayonnaise may not be offensive on a sandwich or salad. Since there are so many different types of olive oil, my experience only applies to bitter extra virgin olive oil. A light olive oil may be as pleasing to use as canola oil.
  17. An electric whisk can be used to make recipes for making mayonnaise in a food processor. Use a bowl that is barely larger than the whisk, use the highest setting on the mixer, and mix the mayonnaise in one direction.

Pasteurizing The Eggs

Making Mayonnaise With Jacques Pépin

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Making Mayonnaise With Emeril Lagasse With An Electric Whisk

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Notes: 1) (Emeril Lagasse) vegetable oil makes mayonnaise with the flavor of Hellmann’s mayonnaise (Hellman’s may be popular) (1 cup vegetable oil or 1 cup vegetable oil + 1/4 cup olive oil), 2) (Thomas Keller) use canola oil or the canola oil used to make garlic confit, 3) (Thomas Keller) possibly use canola and French mustard (Edmond Fallot), 4) (Jacques Pépin) use greater proportions of flavorful ingredients: vinegar, use walnut, or tarragon oil, 5) use vinaigrette recipes for creating a new mayonnaise (sherry vinegar and red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar), 6) consider adding fruit to mayonnaise, 7) experiment with different types of salt, 8) consider what the majority of people may prefer, 9) mayonnaise with a lot of mustard flavor may be called dijonnaise

Notes: 1) mayonesa: soybean oil, egg yolks, water, distilled vinegar, sugar, iodized salt, spices, lime juice concentrate, disodium edta (added to protect flavor), extractives of paprika, natural flavor, and extractives of red pepper, 2) water may be used to thin the mayonnaise

Download The Recipes:

Mayonnaise Of Jacques Pépin

Emeril’s Homemade Mayonnaise

Things People Need To Know About Making Mayonnaise

1. Holly Herrick: The French Cook: Sauces (Utah: Gibbs Smith, 2013), 75-78.

2. Jacques PépinJacques Pépin’s Complete Techniques (New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2001), 124-126, 56-59.

3. Emeril Lagasse: Emeril’s Kicked-Up Sandwiches: Stacked with Flavor (New York: William Morrow, 2012), 309.

4. Fig. 1. Holly Herrick: The French Cook: Sauces (Utah: Gibbs Smith, 2013), 78.